Book Review: ‘India after Gandhi’ by Ramchandra Guha

“for Indian children history itself comes to an end with Partition and Independence. As a constituent of social studies, and later on as a subject in its own right, history runs out of content in 1947…All that has happened during the last 55 years may filter through the measly civics syllabus, popular cinema and television; history as formally constituted knowledge of the past does not cover it.”

These words by educationist Krishna Kumar precisely convey what history means for most Indians; for us, history always meant the events till 1947. No-one ever discussed what happened after independence; the years which marked the most crucial phase of our country; the period when the biggest democracy in the world was coming to life. The book spans six decades of post-partition, independent India and Guha chronologically unfolds the past sixty years commencing with post-partition aftermath, the problems faced by nationalists in integrating India, the years of growth and despair which tested our intelligence and integrity, the dynamic leadership of Nehru & Patel, the shakedown of Indian National Congress (the interesting phase of Jayaprakash Narayan), and finally the rise of populism. And in the epilogue section, he talks about how has India survived these sixty years and the binding forces which hold India together.

The portion of book covering the years of drafting of Indian Constitution and Nehru’s regime is really awe-inspiring. The work of Nehru to overturn the caste system, to keep India as a secular state, to not let India divide along linguistic and religious lines, and to create a just society is admirable. Not to forget the works of Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, who was a untouchable himself and the primary draftsman of the Constitution, Vallabhbhai Patel and other countless nationalists and leaders who worked tirelessly to merge diverse people of many castes, religions, languages, and cultures into one vibrant, democratic nation.

For one thing, don’t go by the size and the number of pages of this book. History never seemed this intriguing, interesting and inquisitive. The flow and narrative of the book is arresting; once you start a chapter, you just cling onto it and the moment you finish it, the whole chapter starts lingering. The amount of research work which has gone into this book is just incredible with the book having around 100 pages just in references (oh yes! this reduces the book by 100 pages ;) ). Guha’s voice is crisp, calm and eloquent and all the facts have been produced in a coherent manner. Guha has been able to answer the enigmatic question why India exists despite its complex cultural and political diversity and continues to survives as a unique, modern, non-western democracy. Guha’s account of history of modern India is truly remarkable, extra-ordinary and a long lasting one!

I would like to end by sharing this sweet little quote:

“India is a pluralist society that creates magic with democracy, rule of law and individual freedom, community relations and [cultural] diversity. What a place to be an intellectual!…I wouldn’t mind being born ten times to rediscover India.”

ROBERT BLACKWILL, departing US ambassador, in 2003

A must read.

My Rating: 4.75/5 (perfect book!!!)

Book Review: ‘Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls’ by David Sedaris

What do you do when you have stupid MBA examinations starting in a day? Your are forced to read a highly middling and boring book on International Business, people in your college campus discuss irksome coursework and bring down your spirits and the whole environment becomes depressing. Simple! You read David Sedaris…and laugh your ass off!! :-) This is the third Sedaris book I’ve read after Me Talk Pretty One Day and Naked and believe me folks, this guy never disappoints; he’s just getting better and better with time! This guy has the ability to make any damn person on this earth laugh!

 

The book is a collection of short essays and stories and his writing style is still the same: observing the world and adding his kinky views to it which ensures that you have a perpetual grin on your face with occasional bursts of laughter. All the trivial experiences narrated are not very engrossing but it’s his wit, his satire, his irony, and his sarcasm which makes them interesting. He talks a lot about his travelling experiences in the book and it extends from a modest North American Costco store to all the way to Australia and its native Kookaburras. He spares no one, be it his father or his mother and even goes on to share his first colonoscopy experience as if it is being discussed over a cup of coffee. He can bring out humor of just about any situation and at the same time, be perfectly relatable even in eccentric situations.

Maybe I was little biased (because I loved his other works), or maybe it was just the right book at the right time (examination time :P), or maybe the troublesome life, but from the joys of colonoscopies to finding the perfect taxidermied owl, I loved every essay in this book. I needed a laugh and Sedaris didn’t disappoint. I can just go on and on bragging about this guy.

Highly recommended.

My Rating: 4.25/5

Book Review: ‘The Mahabharata Quest: The Alexander Secret’ by Christopher C. Doyle

A lot of people had been complaining that my blog is slowly and slowly evolving into a travelogue, so I thought why not give a shot to a book review. And here I’m with my first book review :-) The first book that I will review is ‘The Mahabharata Quest: The Alexander Secret’ by Christopher C. Doyle. I was at Crossword Bookstore in Bangalore two weeks back, where the ‘Crossword Recommends’ shelf caught attention of my eyes. Being a lover of mythological and mystery-thriller genre, and the blurb on the book revealing that it’s a perfect combination of both the genres with a tinge of history, I immediately picked up the book without any second thoughts.

Mahabharata and Alexander the Great – What can they have anything in common? Well, that’s what the plot is about…Alexander the Great had been on a secret quest to attain the ‘secret of gods’ which would make him immortal; a secret which laid hidden in Mahabharata but alas something went wrong in his quest and the secret remained buried with him, till now!…but not anymore! A group of powerful people are trying to get their hands on the secret so that they can rule the world. Will the Intelligence Bureau be able to stop them? Or will the world become slave to them? Read the book to find out :-)

Though the book follows a typical suspense-thriller premiss, it is still a pretty engrossing & gripping read and author has done a great job in making a good blend of mythology, history and science. It shows that a lot of research work must have been made for writing the book and it paid off well and surely deserves some applauds. Though it’s fiction, the writing and the flow of the book is so smooth, that it becomes difficult to differentiate between reality and fiction. However, at certain points, you’ll feel the book becomes too technical and you’ll tend to lose your concentration at these points. Also, the book has lot of references to the first book of the author, ‘The Mahabharata Secret’, and it would be more interesting if one has read the first novel as it would give you a lot of insight about the characters and their adventures, though there are just few references to the previous book and it’s perfectly okay if one has not read the first book by the author.

Definitely recommended for the intriguing plot, the sheer amount of research that went into writing it, and the thrills! Can easily be finished in one go. Recommended to anyone who likes mystery, thriller and mythological genres.

My Rating: 3.25/5

A Drop of Heaven

So, my long-dead blog is finally back to life again and I’m back on popular demand ;) Travel and Photography have been the major theme of this blog so far and I would continue the trend with this post. I know this blog is slowly converting into a travelogue but I just can’t help it…travel and photography completes me, they are an integral part of my life.

For the past few months I have been busy (yes, you heard it right…I, myself don’t know how, why and when did this happen…but I’ve been busy). Presentations, Assignments and Tests – three words which have become synonymous with my life, a sleep schedule which has been reduced from 12 hours to less than 6 hours every night, no free Sundays and almost no time for reading and runs – this is what my life had been reduced to for the last four months. And then happened the unbelievable one Sunday – a spare Sunday with no work and suddenly we were ‘dazed and confused’ what should we do with all this free time. And then, I and my friends decided we needed an escape…an escape from the highly mediocre and monotonous life and eventually we landed at Nandi Hills.

The plan was to witness a mesmerizing sunrise atop Nandi Hills, so we started at 3 in the morning and reached the foot of the hills at 5 a.m. where we got to know that the vehicles are allowed only after 6 a.m. So, without wasting a second, switching on the flashlights of our cell-phones, and with a portable speaker, a guitar and a camera, we started climbing the hills because craziness is what is required to spice up the life. Deafening silence, chilly air, lush greenery, fog, and madness accompanied all of us for the next one hour, when the vehicles started whooshing past us and we hopped into our cab and reached the top of the hill. The pleasant drive up the hill made me realize how divine the mornings are and also how we are rotting in the city with all the infrastructure; miles away from the nature.

A bike wooshing past us!

A bike wooshing past us!

Silhouette!

Silhouette!

Le Me....engrossed in the spectacular beauty!

Le Me….engrossed in the spectacular beauty!

The top of the hill is a huge cliff falling into gorges and all you can see is a bedded layer of snow-white clouds. If you climb down one side of the hill, you come across a dense forest with a stone-laid stair path where it is always drizzling in patches. When mountains obstruct the clouds, the foothills get rain (I had to refer to class 7th geography lessons to get this info ;-)  ). At the top, we experienced clouds moving fast and un-cluttered and could see the surrounding hills, plains, and curly roads down beneath us. What serene view it was! Totally indescribable.

Sorry about that water droplet on lens

Sorry about that water droplet on lens

Mesmerizing!

Into the Wild!

'I love the smell of mud in the morning' (ok...Al Pacino is gonna kill me for this)

‘I love the smell of mud in the morning’ (ok…Al Pacino is gonna kill me for this)

More Mud...More High!

More Mud…More High!

A fantasy world!

A fantasy world!

Alright, let's drop it!

Alright, let’s drop it!

The reason why it's called Nandi Hills!

The reason why it’s called Nandi Hills!

Knot of hopes!

Knots of hopes!

After spending 3 hours in the lap of nature and experiencing her miraculous beauty, it was time to return back to the ‘society’. The drive down the hill was as pleasurable as the ride up the hill. I saw some cyclists and runners climbing up the hill and my heart, mind & soul was filled with envy. Maybe next time, my fat would serve as the fuel to go atop the hill and not the gasoline :-)

Until next post…cheers!…Hopefully it’ll be up soon.

P.S. Click on the italicized & underlined text within single quotes to listen to some amazing songs :)

 

Eye of the Beholder

“A teardrop on the cheek of eternity” – Rabindranath Tagore

“The embodiment of all things pure” – Rudyard Kipling

“It makes the sun and moon shed tears from their eyes” – Emperor Shah Jahan

Still no clue what I’m talking about? Alright I’ll tell you then. I’m talking about Taj Mahal, the epitome of love and I’m gonna write a post on it after hibernating for almost six months. Time for some history lessons first.

Built by the fifth Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan, in the memory of his beloved wife, Arjumand Banu (widely known by the epithet Mumtaz Mahal) as a monument of love, Taj Mahal is the most architecturally famous and magnificent mausoleum in the world. Legend has it that she was emperor’s favorite wife and accompanied Shah Jahan and his entourage in every military campaign. While on one such campaign, while giving birth to her 14th child,  she passed away and Shah Jahan’s last words to her were that he would build a monument so beautiful in her honour that no other building could match its beauty. The memorial was built by over 20,000 labourers and craftsmen in 22 years and as promised by Shah Jahan to his departing wife, the Taj Mahal is widely deemed as one of the most beautiful and magnificent pieces of architecture of all times.

The quintessential feature that separates Taj Mahal from rest of the buildings is symmetry. The entire monument is perfectly symmetrical upon all the four sides. Every engraving, carving, minaret and even the gardens are in perfect symmetry to the minutest detail. The only flaw in the symmetry of entire structure is the placement of coffins, which hold Shah Jahan and Mumtaz; the coffin of the empress was placed in the centre of mausoleum first but when the emperor died, his coffin was squeezed beside the empress’ by their eldest daughter, thereby disturbing the symmetry. The mausoleum along with the four minarets is built on the top of a high marble plinth, raising it several meters above the ground, resulting the sky to be the only background when you gaze at it, a feature unique only to Taj Mahal of all the buildings in the world. The marble used in construction of Taj Mahal is translucent and appears as if it changes color as the day passes by; pinkish in the morning, milky white in the afternoon & evening and golden by moonlight. The changing colors are said to signify the changing moods of a woman in a day. The four minarets were constructed after the construction of the mausoleum to add to the beauty of the structure and they incline slightly outwards (2.5 degrees), so that in case of an earthquake if they ever fall, they don’t damage the main building. On the East and the West side of the Taj are located Mehman Khana (guest house) and the mosque, completely similar in structure and there’s no way you can differentiate the two until told about it. From the backside of Taj, Yamuna river and Red Fort (where Shah Jahan spent last 8 years of his life) are clearly visible. And finally, the intrinsic marble work, precious stones inlaid in marbles in floral motifs, the Quran calligraphy on the tomb leave you completely awed by the surreal beauty of this place.

And it’s time for some pictures now.

The main entrance to Taj Mahal - the South Gate

The main entrance to Taj Mahal – The South Gate

These 22 domes (11 behind the visible domes) signify the 22 years of construction

These 22 domes (11 more behind these domes) signify the 22 years taken for construction

Notice even the shadow is symmetrical at this moment!

Notice even the shadow is symmetrical at this moment!

From a different perspective (shot by the guide)

From a different perspective (shot by the guide)

The Mausoleum

The Mausoleum

Entrance to the main building

Entrance to the main building

Complex mable work, Arabic calligraphy and Stone inlay work

Complex mable work, Arabic calligraphy and Stone inlay work

IMG_8484

Different angle

The 40 ft. high minaret with the mosque in the background

The 40 ft. high minaret with the mosque in the background

Overlooking the main gate

Overlooking the main gate

Lush green fields

Lush green garden

Adieu

Adieu

So I’d just like to add that visiting Taj Mahal is a phenomenal experience and evokes a multitude of emotions in you. It’s a must visit place for anyone on this planet.

Untill next post…Cheers!

Paradox

We all look for signs of god
We all look for existence of god
Some on the mountains
Some in a rock
Some in photos
And, some turn to a direction

But, seldom do we look what's next to us
That made you what you are
That helped you stand up after every hit you took
From parents to guardians
From friends to enemies

Flowered by their unconditional love
And the lessons of life
They are your gods
They are the blessings

So next time
Before blaming your fate
Before comparing your lucks
Look at those
Those who aren't as blessed
With no home, no food, no support

This is the time
Time to show, that god exists in you
Time to bring purpose to life
Time to thank god 
Time to share your blessings

Lets brighten their lives Lets be their hope Lets make heaven Lets make heaven on earth..

- KK (My friend)

A sample of Bandhavgarh

This post should have been written a year and half ago, so I had to go down the memory lane and dig into my memories to recollect as much as I could.

Whenever anyone thinks of the big striped predator cats, Bandhavgarh is the first name that comes to their minds. Home to exotic Royal Bengal Tigers, Bandhavgarh National Park has the highest density of tigers in India and statistically, the probability of sighting  a tiger in this park is more than anyplace in this whole world. So, If you are expecting some photos of tigers in this post, I suggest you to press the ‘Ctrl. + W’ keys on your keyboard and see the magic yourself.

The best way to reach Bandhavgarh is to take a train till Katni, a small town in Madhya Pradesh, and drive to the park from there. Scheduled for the 2 P.M. safari, we started from Katni at around 11. Cruising along the smooth road with loud music in the cold month of  January with a perpetual sunshine, it was a great way to kick start my 20 days vacation after four months of monotonous college life. We passed through rural India, experienced wide variety of  landscapes from barren lands to lush green fields, quiet to raging rivers, women carrying clay pots full of water on their heads and child on the hip, animals roaming aimlessly in the fields, long and shady trees lining both sides of the road.

Splendid!

Scenic landscape during the way

We were about 50 kms. away from the park and then suddenly the unexpected happened – a flat tyre. Owing to the hot bolts it took 15-20 mins. for it to be replaced. Since we were getting late for the safaris, reckless and rash driving for the last 30 mins. ensured that we reached the park just in time.

Flat Tyre

Flat Tyre

There are two safaris in a day, one in morning and other in the evening and for each, a permit is required . Forest has delimited path for the open safari jeep. All the entrance paths lead to a central huddle point from where the information is exchanged about the tiger sighting zones. From the central point, the safari jeep follows the path assigned in the permit.

Bumpy safari drive along the uneven, rutted path of the park and the anticipation to spot the beast kept us on the edge of our seats throughout our whole time inside the park. We took two safaris but none of them proved to be fruitful. We, however, did sight other animals and birds. Bandhavgarh has a very dense population of deers – around 15,000 and out of these 15,000 we managed to see around 1500 deers, no kidding. Deers can even be found in the buffer zone of the park, outside the core area. If not the tiger itself, we did manage to get a glimpse of its pug-marks and hear its roar.

A Sample of Bandhavgarh

Welcome to the Jungle

Safari Jeep

Safari Jeep

Inside the forest

Inside the forest

Deer posing!

Deer posing!

Cute Langur!

Cute Langur!

Elephant

Elephant

Deers savoring the Sun

Deers savoring the Sun

This is how a tiger marks it territory by scratching the trees

This is how a tiger marks it territory by scratching the trees

Isolated

Isolated

Everyone waiting for a glimpse

Waiting for a glimpse

Splendid Forests

Splendid Forests

Broken horn of a deer. But the driver didn't let me pick it.

Broken horn of a deer. But the driver didn’t let me pick it.

After spending nearly 10 hours in the park, we were letdown but this board at the exit of the park did provide some solace. We were in two different safari jeeps and were assigned different zones for the safari.It was disappointing that our jeep couldn’t sight the beast but the fact that my friends and cousins in the other safari also couldn’t spot anything gave such a comforting and delightful feeling. (Haha… I’m such a sadist)

Some Consolation

Some Consolation

After returning back from the park, it was time to pack our bags and return back to Katni, and continue with our next destination of the itinerary. However, a small Macro photo session with the flowers of the resort, just before leaving helped me in refreshing myself.

A flower from the resort

A flower from the resort

Ah..Hungry Ants!

Ah..Hungry Ants!

Stay tuned…New post on the next stop, Pachmari will be up soon. Until then..Cheers!

Faith in humanity restored!

When was the last time you didn’t see negative news on the front page of a newspaper? Can’t remember, right? While rapes, scams, shootings, wars and all dominate the headlines, there are folks, right amongst us, who with their deeds and sacrifices keep a check on human race and make this world a place worth living, who once in a while restore your faith in humanity, who are present in every country, every city and every neighborhood, who with their random act of kindness, make you believe this world is not as bad as you thought it to be. And I witnessed one such act this Sunday evening.

I was at this grocery store near my house to get some cheese. There’s a temple adjacent to the store, so the whole region is always a bit crowded with beggars and poor people. People, for whom, the temple means the whole world, who have paper thin body, long & greasy hair, who have just one asset – an old, dented mug filled with pennies, making rattling sound, who just know one statement “Please spare some change”, a sight at which you always feel sorry. It was a usual Sunday evening with empty streets and everyone rejoicing the free day of the week . I stepped out off the car and noticed there was just one guy outside the temple but on a wheelchair, his eyes filled with anticipation that someone would pass some food or money to him. As I was about to enter  the store, I saw a guy who had just bought his grocery (3-4 bags), moving out of the store, towards his car. This guy, then saw the poor, handicapped person on the wheel chair and without a second thought or hesitation, he went straight to him and handed-over all the grocery bags and the money he had, to him and brought a broad, dazzling smile on poor man’s face. A smile when someone is really satisfied and content from inside. The whole incident gave me goosebumps and just left me speechless.

That day I realized how blessed we are, but how we always fail to see it and how we can share our blessings through such gestures. A Rs. 100 or a $5 note might not mean much to you but always remember, it means a world to someone else..

Udaipur – The White City

In the western side of the country, sharing border with the rival country, Pakistan, dwells the Indian state of Rajasthan, a state of camels and deserts, a land of spectacular and majestic forts & landscapes, a place of rich heritage & culture and  mouth-watering cuisines (Dal-Baati-Churma & Ghewars), a land of long and glorious history, a place where royalty is a way of life. Abode to fearless, brave, tenacious and notorious Rajput warriors and kings, the state is rightly called Rajasthan, ‘The land of Kings’.

2013 was already proving to be a good year for travelling; ancestral villages and temples in January, Ranthambhore in February, and then it was Udaipur in March . Udaipur was founded by Maharana Udai Singh in 1559 when he shifted the capital of Mewar from Chittorgarh to Udaipur. With seven artificial, inter-connected and beautiful lakes, the city is aptly known as ‘City of lakes’, ‘Kashmir of Rajasthan’, and ‘Venice of the East’. Owing to the white buildings and houses, it’s also called ‘The White city’.

With just one day in hand, I had to squeeze the most out of this splendid city and kicked off the day with authentic, heavy and delicious Rajasthani dish, Dal-Baati.

Dal-Baati!

Dal-Baati

The first spot on the list was ‘The City Palace’. Located on the banks of Lake Pichola, it was constructed by Maharana Udai Singh in 1559 and has many other palaces built within. The city palace is divided in three parts – one-third has been converted into the museum for general public, another third is the home of the 76th king of the Mewar dynasty, Maharaja Arvind Singh Mewar and last third was turned into a hotel in 1963 by the Maharja and is now managed by HRH group of Hotels (I think HRH stands for His Royal Highness…Haha). Massive in size, this palace provides an amazing insight into elegant Mewar culture and architecture, a great view of the city, and is a must visit for everyone who visits Udaipur.

City Palace!

Entrance to City Palace

Residence of current King!

Residence of the current King and an awesome Vintage car!

Museum Part of City Palace!

Museum Part of City Palace

As you enter the City Palace, you get a stunning view of The Lake Palace hotel located in the Lake Pichola, a sight that you just don’t want to stop staring at. Built from 1743 to 1746 by Maharana Jagat Singh II as a summer resort to get respite from heat it was known as Jag Niwas island and was later turned into a luxury hotel and the management was overtaken by Taj Hotels in 1971 and since then, its called Taj Lake Palace. Today, it’s considered as the most romantic hotel in India. Tranquil blue water of the lake reflecting the calm blue sky, Arravali mountains and the Palace constituted a breath-taking view.

Lake Palace!

Lake Palace!

The whole museum is divided into several Mahals, and has many Gates and Chowks. Just as you enter the fort, you see a wall lined with yellow, red and white flags & a lush green garden which gives you a royal feeling of the era of 1600’s. This place is called Bada Chowk and is the main compound of the palace.

Red, Yellow & White!

Red, Yellow & White!

Palace Compound!

Bada Chowk

The entrance to the main museum is through an impressive gateway, which boasts two warriors on a golden mosaic painting. Once inside, you again have to go through a security check. As you move on, you come across a hall displaying old arms and weapons such as guns, swords, pistols, spears etc. The palace is so huge that after passing through several rooms, passages, verandahs and galleries, I was unable to keep track and remember the names of all the places, though I remember a few.

Padharo Mhare Desh!

Padharo Mhare Desh!

Pillars!

Pillars!

The next point was Badi Mahal which is situated at the highest point of the palace. Being the highest point in the palace, it provides an awesome panoramic view of the White city and Lake Pichola. Badi Mahal features a beautiful garden with trees, flowers and fountains. Inside, it also contains beautiful stained windows.

Inside Badi Mahal!

Inside Badi Mahal!

Udaipur - The White City

Udaipur – The White City

Stained Glasses

Stained Glasses

Vani Vilas

Vani Vilas

Next up was Mor Chowk or The Peacock courtyard and this is the most beautiful place inside the palace. It contains five peacock mosaics with fine glass work and this makes it an amazing piece of art. No place inside the palace was as remarkable and attractive as the Mor Chowk.

Peacocks!

Mor Chowk!

Amar Mahal displays the orthodox Indian kitchen and items of common use in an exotic manner. From clay pots, metallic utensils, fans to Chulhas made of clay and stones which used wood as fuel. The sheer size of pots and utensils made me imagine the size of the kings, their waistlines and how much efforts the cooks must had to put in for preparing the food.

Amar Mahal

Amar Mahal

Utensils

Metallic Utensils

Having already spent 2 hours in the palace and restricted by time, we had to cover the rest of the palace quickly without spending much time at a particular spot and thus I was unable to gather much information about other places but just the pictures.

Nice place to work...ain't it?

Nice place to work…ain’t it?

'Hat Tables' in Zenana Mahal

‘Hat Tables’ in Zenana Mahal

Picture Gallery

Picture Gallery

Almost a recursion!

Almost a recursion!

Symmetry!

Symmetry!

The final 10 minutes were spent in checking out the most expensive place of the palace; a place where everything is made up of pure Silver from Mandap to chariots.

A 'Shaadi Mandaap' made totally of Silver used for marriage of king's son 2 years back

A ‘Shaadi Mandaap’ made totally of Silver used for marriage of king’s son 2 years back

Silver Chariot!

Silver Chariot!

Rich Folks!

Rich Folks!

Finally, it was time to leave the City Palace. It’s massive size, beautiful architecture, dazzling views, stained glasses makes it one of the best monuments in Rajasthan or might be in India too.

On the way out

On the way out

Moti Magari, Maharana Pratap Memorial, was the next destination. An impressive Bronze statue of Maharana Pratap Singh on his favorite and faithful horse, Chetak, stands atop Moti Magari overlooking Fateh Sagar Lake. The statue is so beautifully carved that each and every nerve on both Maharana Pratap and his horse Chetak are clearly visible. Maharana Pratap never surrendered the independence of Mewar to Mughals when all other Rajput kingdoms had submitted to the wills of Akbar. And as a result Battle of Haldighati was fought in 1576, which lasted only for 4 hours. The battle didn’t have any clear outcome but is remembered for its hero, Chetak. Maharana Pratap had injured himself and so had his horse, but despite the injuries Chetak carried Mahrana Pratap on his back to a safe place after sprinting for nearly 2 miles on three legs. On the way, while trying to leap a strem, Chetak wounded himself and succumbed to injuries and thus became a legend.

Maharana Pratap and Chetak statue

Maharana Pratap and Chetak statue

Boating while watching the Sun setting over the Fateh Sagar lake in the evening hours is a must-do activity in Udaipur. The calmness and peace it provides is totally unmatched. It also provides a great opportunity for photographers to capture the sunset and twilight.

Mountain Silhouette

Mountain Silhouette

Tired and exhausted, we decided to visit the last spot, Nimach Mata Temple located on a hill-top and call it a day. The only access to the temple is through the rope-way. At almost a height of 1 km., it provides a stunning view of the Lake palace amidst the Pichola lake and City Palace by the lake, both bathing in artificial lights.

Atop the Hill

Atop the Mountain

Night View!

Night View!

Untill next post…Cheers! Stay tuned.